~ guitar method ~

~ 5 scale shapes ~

'... patterns of pitches that help us learn the theory and work its magic ...'

blue core
butter
arpeggio
h
h
subdivide

In a nutshell: Simply to complete the process discovering how a set group of stepwise pitches is reconfigured into its arpeggios and how this arpeggio becomes the diatonic chords for this particular group of pitches. Our main theory goal here is to develop the skills to spell out the letter names of the diatonic triads within a key center.

Pentatonic shape (s). This half step above the tonic is often simply referred to

by its numerical designation. Generally we'll use the sharp (#) when ascending away from the tonic and the flat (b) designation when descending towards our tonic pitch. I also call this pitch a blue note, but I'm probably the only one that does.

half step
music notation
shortnin'

Triads. This half step above the tonic is often simply referred to by its numerical designation. Generally we'll use the sharp (#) when ascending away from the tonic and the flat (b) designation when descending towards our tonic pitch. I also call this pitch a blue note, but I'm probably the only one that does.

half step
music notation

'Box scales.' This half step above the tonic is often simply referred to by its numerical designation. Generally we'll use the sharp (#) when ascending away from the tonic and the flat (b) designation when descending towards our tonic pitch. I also call this pitch a blue note, but I'm probably the only one that does.

half step
music notation

Objective: Simply to understand the theoretical process of how our stepwise scale groupings evolve into our wider, major and minor third interval arpeggios.

Overview: By having examined the origins and organization of our 12 pitch melodic resource, we now have a solid foundation of pitch to advance our studies towards our chords or harmony. In between the evolution of our scales into chords live the arpeggios. And as we'll see in the following discussion, that while the process of evolving scales into their arpeggios is theoretically a rather elementary process, the vast artistic resource we gain is rather quite stunning.

harmony
equal temper
scales
numerical scale degrees
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
two octave C major scale
C
D
E
F
G
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
A
B
C
arpeggio degrees
1
.
3
.
5
.
7
.
9
.
11
.
.
.
15
C major arpeggio
C
.
E
.
G
.
B
.
D
.
F
.
.
.
C

'A half step above our tonic pitch.'

Theory names: This half step above the tonic is often simply referred to by its numerical designation. Generally we'll use the sharp (#) when ascending away from the tonic and the flat (b) designation when descending towards our tonic pitch. I also call this pitch a blue note, but I'm probably the only one that does.

half step
music notation